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that movement, built on that premise, largely dissolved. and it's the same year dr. king was killed. c-span: i have a better copy of "parting the waters." this is a paperback version. you won a pulitzer prize for this. how many hardback copies did you sell and how many of these paperbacks up to today? >> guest: i would have to talk to my publisher. only be a rough estimate of 100,000 heart attacks and 200 or maybe 300,000 paperbacks which it is peanuts for stephen king for a big six history book based on a subject that might make some people uncomfortable, but other people for me at least it's a great leveling transformation to hear. there's a lot of black heroes and white heroes. it's a cross-cultural drama. c-span: your credit -- i think it is an outfit called lyndhurst of chattanooga -- and the macarthur of chicago and the ford foundation as places that have given you money over the years; is the right? >> guest: yes. after "parting the waters" came out, because this book has taken nine years. the ford foundation gave me my first and only a research grant that i used to hire somebody for tw
which dr. king could not resist, and lyndon johnson couldn't. they were constantly being pushed from below by people who wanted action. johnson becomes president on november 22, 1963. he is an accidental president. he had been in the backwaters of the vice-presidency. heed been drinking too much. he was fat. he was unhappy. he was cantankerous, and he was a forgotten man. martin luther king, on that day, faced a crisis of his own. the civil rights legislation that john f. kennedy finally introduced in june of '63, pushed by the demonstrations in birmingham, which revealed the police dogs dogs and the fire h. suddenly the government had to act. the first great accomplishment of lynn johnson son, that not much attention is given to, is the magnificent way he assumed the presidency. this was a nation in crisis. we had a cold war going on. in which the -- there was huge fear of russian missiles heading our way. our president had been killed. we didn't know whether it was the russians who had kill him or castro or -- it was great, great uncertainty. and johnson came to that job, reassured
there was three of us. now sometimes children you don't think of dr. martin luther king jr. as a child but he was really a child and grew up just like you, and so that's why i wanted to write this book. the book is entitled" my brother martin." it has lots of illustrations in it. i hope that you will have a chance to get to see the book more closely. ok. so this is part of it. a sister remembers. the sister, of course, is me. ok. the book starts out -- i will arche some words that martine some more of the martin said and the march i have a dream that one day little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with the little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers. i have a dream today. that's what he said in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read
conversation with the desk clerk, really funny. i said is there a dr. king staying at the hotel? in spanish. he wants to try his english out on me. king? how do you say that in spanish? i said ray. he said i will do the spanish in english. [speaking spanish] >> for whom that is -- one time we had -- we never had a king. i said his name is king. you said dr. king. the doctor thing, forget the king. just look at the register. i had 480 more hotels to call -- maybe. and he looks at the register and it says kingo. he had to put an o on their somehow. i said really? yes. it is better in spanish. [speaking spanish] >> in spanish a black uncle and we say a black guy. so funny using the word in that context. his last words, running out the door, around the corner down to the castillo, almost like crossing the new jersey turnpike which is one of my other books, the new jersey turnpike and the native new yorker i am dodging traffic like crazy and get to the hotel and picked up the phone in the lobby and say will you connect me with his room and picks up the phone and says hello? he was exhausted. he had
develop in the same spirit of dr. king. that is what i'm doing at the king center and we are in the process of getting a whole new facility that will be more interactive so when young people come it will be like a social -- socially conscious disney experience. when we leave there it will be like you are in attain but you will be inspired and educated at the same time. >> host: is at the knees are still a baptist church? >> guest: there are two locations the historic heritage sanctuary which was just restored and reopened last april where people people can comment to her. it sits right next to the center. mother made sure she placed the king center in that community to preserve that community. it was a very driving community for african-americans back in the early 20s, 30s, 40s and 50's and they were in the process of demolishing many of the homes there. one of them was my father's birth home but because of my mother's vision to place us under their end to save that birth home and other homes have been saved as a result in the community and it's in a much better place bec
to hear dr. king's speech and the speeches by others. >> host: we're speaking with jim wallace, photographer, and he has put together this book, "courage of the moment. the civil rights struggle 1961-1964." thanks so much. >> guest: thank you. >> here's a look at some books that are being published this week. >> look or for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> if you want to convert people, you've got to, first of all, persuade them that their soul is in dire danger, headed for the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. and for that you need to label them follow orers of the definitely -- followers of the devil, satan. diabolical human beings. so they look for the devil and look among the deities, a very complex religion. very elaborate, very well structured, and they looked among the deities, and they found be issue, the deity called issue. who's issue? i often refer to issue as the imminent -- [inaudible] of the human condition. why do i call him that? issue is an unpredictable spirit. i
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)